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Borosyndicate Showcases World-Class Glass Artists

Borosyndicate—a brick-and-mortar glass art gallery and retail location, complete with a separate glassblowing facility—produces its own brand of items as well as known glass brands.

A Hall of Fame of glassblowing artist is featured in the gallery. You’ll find legends like Ryan O’Keefe, Steve Sizelove, Peter Muller, Lord, Jeff Green, and Jeff Smart. See examples.

In the history of cannabis and arts, glassblowing has been a tradition. This includes pioneers such as Jason Harris (Jerome Baker Designs). The art has been around since the 1970s. It gained popularity with waterpipes, spoons, Sherlocks, waterpipes, rigs, etc. Artists are often able to make functional art from animals and characters.

Borosyndicate, where glass is made into fine art, sells high-end creations by artists who have the highest reputations and feature the best percolators and diffusers. On the top shelf areas, you’ll find high-end fine glass with brands like Illadelph and Dawnk Glass. But you can find artistically-inspired spoon pipes, heavy with marbles and colorful swirl features, for bargain prices. You won’t find two identical spoonpipes.

Borosyndicate Productions was established in Salt Lake City by Kenny Holliday, who also owns the Borosyndicate Retail Store. Holliday, who is self-taught at the craft of glassblowing, helps create apprenticeships for students.

“Borosyndicate has been in business for over 15 years,” Holliday told Chronic News. High ratings for the storefront and gallery are still evident online. There have been many testimonials over the years.

Borosilicate glasses are often chosen for their ability to resist thermal variation as well as because they have a high strength and resistance from shattering. It is essential to think about the breakability of fine glass. Cheap imitations will last less time than heavier pipes.

“The scientific name of the type of glass we work with is borosilicate,” he said. “We took a spin on the name and changed it to Borosyndicate. It is an artist group with similar interests, who are all interested in the same thing: making art using borosilicate. Hence the reason for syndicate instead of silicate.”

Other glass retail outlets have been around for a while, but Borosyndicate has been there and done it. “When COVID first started we thought we were going to shut down and no one was going to come in, but we were fortunate enough to have an incredible staff that were more than willing to come to work every day without missing a beat,” he said. “Our loyal and amazing patrons supported us more than ever during that difficult time which helped us tremendously get through the worst part of the pandemic.”

The company opened many locations over the years. “We did have two locations, but unfortunately, we recently had to close one location due to the landlord turning the building into climate-controlled storage,” Holliday said. “At the moment, we have one brick-and-mortar retail location as well as a separate glassblowing facility where all of our in-house glass is created. We are working on getting a second retail location open again very soon.”

You can purchase directly through the website Borosyndicate.com or Borosyndicate’s Instagram @borosyndicate. Additional accessories, like dab pads and grinders can be found on the website Borosyndicate.com.

Borosyndicate Artists

The Borosyndicate gallery has a selection of outstanding pieces, and you will be able to purchase a piece for your mantle.

Ryan O’Keefe (@sdryno)

Photo by Angelo Riga, RIP, graphic designer at Borosyndicate

Steve Sizelove (@steve_sizelove)

Borosyndicate
Photo by Angelo Riga, RIP, graphic designer at Borosyndicate

Peter Muller (@mullerglass)

Borosyndicate
Photo by Angelo Riga, RIP, graphic designer at Borosyndicate

Lord (@jsynlord)

Photo by Angelo Riga, RIP, graphic designer at Borosyndicate

Jeff Green (@jeffgreenglass)

Photograph by Angelo Riga (Borosyndicate graphic design), RIP.

Jeff Smart (@jsmartglass)

Photo by Angelo Riga, RIP, graphic designer at Borosyndicate

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